Milestone puma #50 joins the Santa Cruz Puma Project!

50M showing off his impressive claws!

The following guest post was written by Puma Project field technician Sean McCain: Today’s goal was to make a final attempt to access 19F’s den site and collar her two five-week-old kittens so we could monitor them into adulthood. This would be our final attempt because of two factors: The den was located in rough […]

A very intimate glimpse into a puma family

We were recently alerted to this new video from user CougarMagic on Youtube. The video depicts a mom walking with her two kittens who just stops to let them nurse in front of a camera trap. This is an amazing and very rare glimpse into the family life of pumas. Enjoy!

40F: Study enters a new phase

40F

Since the Santa Cruz puma study started in 2008 our research has focused on adult pumas.  Sure, we’ve taken cute photos of kittens to post on our blog (because those blue-eyed, dark-spotted, shaky-kneed kittens are just about the cutest things on 4 legs!), but from a research standpoint we haven’t focused much on them besides […]

Great shots of puma kitten in tree

Mt Lion 8

In the past two weeks, we have been setting out deer baits throughout the Santa Cruz Mountains in hopes of collaring 1-2 new pumas and re-catching a couple of collared individuals. Unfortunately, despite the best efforts of our biologists and hound dogs, the pumas all managed to evade us! While this was disappointing, the team […]

Wildlife activity around the Santa Cruz Mountains

Happy Halloween! The puma project has dozens of trail cameras scattered throughout the Santa Cruz Mountains. Sometimes, the cameras record some really nice footage of other species that call the Bay Area home. It’s a great reminder that pumas and humans share this landscape with many other animals, all of whom play a vital role […]

Self Portraits

29F walking through wilder

Most animals are really difficult to observe since they generally run away when humans approach. One way we get around that is by using motion detecting cameras. These cameras allow animals to take their own self portraits by triggering the shutter as they walk in front of the camera. Many animals aren’t very good photographers. […]